Archive | April, 2019

06 – Bahnhof Hütteldorf to Lainzer Tor (again)

30 Apr

Yes, you read that right. I did the Rundumadum stretch from Hütteldorf to the Lainzer Tor again. This time I was able to walk through the Tiergarten (the Lainz Game Reserve) and get the stamp I need for the “Wandernadel” (the pin you can earn by hiking enough designated paths in the Vienna Woods).

It was a pleasure–and something of a homecoming–to walk through this park I used to go to regularly but hadn’t been through in over seven years. (Dogs aren’t allowed which means that as long as I have had Maylo I have walked elsewhere.) Much was the same–the paths, the picnic tables, and many of the signs–but a lot of lumbering has gone on, as in other parts of the Vienna Woods, and so there were a number of rather forlorn patches I didn’t remember.

I entered through the Nikolaitor (St. Nicholas Gate), remembering my first time when I opened the gate to go in, saw a wild boar standing just meters away, and tried to close the gate again. I couldn’t get it shut because there were people on the other side trying to get out. I let them out, closed the gate, and wondered what to do. Since I knew that people walked in the Tiergarten, I decided to take another look and noticed that there were lots of people, including small children, standing around admiring the boar. Ah, a more or less tame one (photo below). I went in.

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Wild boar, 1989

No boar at the Nikolai Gate on Sunday. Probably the one I saw has long since gone to his heavenly reward. I was unimpeded. I turned right and went along the route I used to know so well. I greeted the first few fellow hikers going by with a friendly “Grüß Gott” only to then remind myself: We’re still in the city. People don’t greet each other here as they do in the mountains. After that, I smiled but said nothing. It was wonderful–much as I love him–to be walking for once without my dog, to go at my own pace (not needing to stop to allow him an intense sniff at something) and to think my own thoughts. I usually try to walk mindfully, but this time I let myself just walk and not try to do or be anything in particular. It was deeply enjoyable.

Because spring came so early and fast this year there wasn’t much to see in the way of blossoms, unlike my first walk in the Lainzer Tiergarten. That was 30 years ago probably pretty much to the day when I took the photo below and showed it to friends at home, amazed and proud of the fact that this was within the city limits.

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Nonetheless, this time I did see a fox skirting around the people excitedly watching it (never seen a fox in the Tiergarten before) and these beautiful purple flowers.

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Before I knew it, I was at the Rohrhaus–the rustic eatery where you can get your card stamped. I briefly considered having coffee and a Milchrahmstrudel (a piece of Topfenstrudel served warm in a sea of warm vanilla sauce),  but they were–not surprisingly given the weather–full, and I suspected there would be quite a long wait. Instead I just asked for the stamp and carried on, thinking I might have better luck at Empress Elisabeth’s retreat, the Hermes Villa.

Even on the way to the Hermes Villa I didn’t see any wild boar, not even a squirrel. But I did see this sign (below), which makes me think perhaps all the animals were resting (“ruhen”) peacefully away from us humans. (The sign makes more sense if you know that in this context “Wild” in German means game, as in, boar, deer, pheasant, and so on.)

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More quickly than I remembered I arrived at the Hermes Villa and saw that outside on the terrace there was a self-service café so I got a delicious cheesecake (actually, more precisely, a “Topfentorte”), and then I carried on to the Lainzer Tor remembering outings with friends and their children to pick “Bärlauch” (wild garlic) and dandelion greens and to read all the informative signs about the trees and bushes along the path.

I arrived at the Lainzer Tor a few minutes before the bus was due to leave to take me back to the bus that would take me to the underground (do you get the sense that this is truly on the edge of the city?) and took the opportunity to check where we go from there. It looks as if Maylo will be allowed on the next stretch and, much as I enjoyed walking without him for once, I’ll be happy to have my hiking companion with me for the next bit.

Distance: 7.6 km

Time: about two hours, even with the coffee break

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P.S. My initial reaction to the boar was apparently not out of place. The British Ambassador had an encounter with a boar in the Lainzer Tiergarten in which he hurt his hand (story here).

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Judasbaum

21 Apr

To think I almost missed the Judasbaum this year. So glad I caught it. ❤

A Viennese Moment

20 Apr

Anyone who has seen “The Third Man” has seen the famous Austrian actor, Paul Hörbiger. He played the concierge who witnessed Harry Lime’s accident and who says one of my favorite lines in the film. When Holly Martins, Lime’s friend, asks questions about the accident, Hörbiger says brusquely and full of fear, “Und jetzt gehen Sie sonst verliere ich meinen Wiener Charme” (“And now get out or I’ll forget my Viennese charm”).

In today’s Kurier there’s a short piece about a documentary on Hörbiger’s life in which the journalist, Georg Markus, tells a story he experienced with Hörbiger in 1979 in Prague, when Hörbiger was about 85 years old. They entered a restaurant where piano music was playing. As often happened, all the other patrons of the restaurant gave Hörbiger an ovation. The pianist, Arnos Vrana, stopped playing what he was playing and started instead to play an old, popular Czech song, “Pisnička Česka”. When he finished, he and Hörbiger fell weeping into each other’s arms.

The song had been composed by one of Hörbiger’s friends, Karel Hašler, who was killed in a concentration camp because he was Jewish. The song was outlawed by the Nazis and because Hörbiger, who already knew about his friend’s fate, was present when it was played by that same pianist in Prague in 1940 he, Hörbiger, was arrested for the first time by the Gestapo. Almost forty years later the pianist had recognized Hörbiger and played the song.

Link to the article: https://kurier.at/kultur/geschichten-mit-geschichte/ein-unerwarteter-anruf-hier-spricht-paul-hoerbiger/400472047

Ducks!

12 Apr

Two ducks just hanging out next to the bike path on the Ring. I love Vienna a.k.a #keenonwien